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A news magazine about the Delaware River and the people who use it.

A news magazine about the Delaware River and the people who use it.

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    DELAWARE CURRENTS ON WJFF-FM

    Meg McGuire is a regular guest on WJFF's program "Making Waves." The show is on every Monday at 8 p.m., Meg is on every third Monday to talk about current issues on the Delaware.

Graphic Illustration by Celia Helfrich

Clean water? Mind your pees and carbons!

The first in a series that examines the delicate relationship between dissolved oxygen in the Delaware River and Bay and an endangered species, the Atlantic sturgeon.

An SRO crowd gathered at the Hancock, N.Y. headquarters of the Friends of the Upper Delaware to hear the details of the new flow plan for the Delaware River. PHOTO BY MEG MCGUIRE

Finding the Goldilocks solution: Getting the temperature just right in the Delaware River

How two New York City reservoirs capture and release Delaware River headwaaters has been a bone of contention in the upper river for years. A solution for part of the problem may be in sight. PHOTO BY MEG MCGUIRE

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States and feds leave DRBC high and dry — again
Editorial Report

Time and again, the Delaware River Basin Commission has to recalculate and reassess its projects because the states and the federal government fail to live up to their financial promises.

The Delaware River was high this spring and early summer -- you might have noticed the water was fast and brown, carrying sediment down river. PHOTO BY MEG MCGUIRE

A potpourri of problems for scientists in the Delaware River and Bay

Microplastics are a hot topic in the Delaware River and bay, as are PFAS and various harmful bacteria near the outflow of wastewater treatment plants all over the watershed. The unsung work of the DRBC’s advisory committees is ON it!!!

Not all commissions attend the public hearings. Here, from left, Pamela Bush, commission secretary and assistant general counsel; Steve Tambini, executive director; Jeffrey Hoffman, New Jersey alternate commissioner  PHOTO BY MEG MCGUIRE

An unusual public hearing for a piece of a big project on the Delaware

So, out of the blue, the Delaware River Basin Commission set a public hearing for the Gibbstown Logistics Center for a new second dock at its site, which is still under construction on the shores of the Delaware River. PHOTO BY MEG MCGUIRE

Irrepressible anglers on a rainy April day, fishing on the West Branch of the Delaware River.PHOTO BY MEG MCGUIRE

How goes the flow? This Delaware River committee wants to know

Anglers who fish in the West Branch of the Delaware River are among the people most interested in how much water there is in the river and how warm the water is. PHOTO BY MEG MCGUIRE

West Branch of the Delaware, you can just catch sight of one of the One Bug drift boats as the river takes it quickly downstream. PHOTO BY MEG MCGUIRE

Going buggy for trout

One of the drift boats in the One Bug trout fishing competition on the West Branch of the Delaware River, you can just catch sight of one of the competitors as the river takes it quickly downstream. PHOTO BY MEG MCGUIRE

The Delaware River just south of Hancock, N.Y.,  PHOTO BY MEG MCGUIRE

Not too much, not too little. Not too warm, not too cold. How to get Delaware River water just right

How much water is released when from the three upriver New York State reservoirs concerns everyone downstream. PHOTO BY MEG MCGUIRE

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Time to stop shortchanging the DRBC
Editorial Report

The Delaware River Basin Commission is charged with looking after the water quality and quantity of the Delaware River for the millions of people in the four states that border it, but only Delaware is keeping its bargain.

Avalon, N.J. during a nor'easter in 2008. PHOTO BY JON COX

Art teams up with science: #4theDelaware

Scolding, brow beating and bullying may not (what a surprise) be the best way to change hearts, minds and beliefs about climate change.

Artists and scientists in the Delaware River watershed are coming together to explore new ways to respect disagreements yet still work toward understanding.

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